Support – Roller / Dingo

Contents



1. Getting Started


Both the Roller and the Dingo are 100% rebuildable, high performance mechanical mods of moderate-to-high complexity. As such, they are suitable for experienced, capable vapers who:

  • possess a good understanding of the nature of mechanical mods, and
  • are able to quickly identify the particular characteristics of each device in order to get the most out of it.

Mech mods are sophisticated, enthusiast-oriented vaping tools. By nature, a mechanical mod requires:

  • Proper handling.
  • Frequent maintenance.

Proper handling guidelines are specific to each device. To help you get up to speed with your new Roller / Dingo, we have written up a quick reference of 10 Important Tips, which also includes some more general, essential information about mech mods and vaping gear:

#1: Do not remove / exchange the main tube or extension that screws onto the metal housing when an atomizer is mounted on your Roller / Dingo.

The switch assembly of the Roller / Dingo is locked in place by the tube mounted directly under the housing. To ensure it’s where you want it to be, always unscrew your atomizer before exchanging tubes.

#2: Do not remove the connector or main tube without cleaning the area around the pole screw from any leaked juice.

The liquid sealing grommet under the 510 connector will do its job only if the connector is pressing firmly against it. It keeps e-liquid out of the switch assembly, so never remove it!

#3: If you need to adjust the pole adjustment screw down too low, remember to remove the o-ring from the pole screw head.

The pole screw head is quite brittle — over-tightening it against the o-ring may cause it to break, since it is not designed to endure excessive stress from below. The o-ring around the pole screw is not needed if you need to adjust the pole low, for example when using the recessed connector supplied with your Roller / Dingo.

#4: Always screw the tube that goes onto the metal housing all the way in.

This ensures that the switch housing is high enough to prevent button jams and keeps sufficient pressure against the liquid-sealing grommet (located under the 510 connector). If your button grinds against the delrin ring around it with the 510 connector / tube firmly tightened, you most likely have a very tight delrin ring installed – this may happen if you got a replacement switch housing with an older unit. Feel free to remove it if you have to – its purpose it purely cosmetic.

#5: Eliminate voltage drop on your mod.

To ensure that no power gets lost on the way to your atomizer, you need to:

  • Always adjust the pole screw of the Roller / Dingo high enough to ensure good contact between your mod and your atomizer!
  • Keep the spring shiny clean and, if necessary, stretch it back to shape.
  • Always ensure that the battery is firmly squeezed by the spring / tube / cap of your Roller / Dingo – bad battery pole contact is the #1 cause for voltage drops when using springs in mods.
#6: Invest in tools and backup equipment.

Measuring your resistances is critical to prevent damage and accidents from short circuits. Protected batteries and resettable fuses are also a must for testing. Always test that new coil with a protected battery or fuse, even if you get a correct open-circuit resistance measurement. Putting power through it may reveal an entirely different story than what your ohm-meter tells you. Keep a few spare cartos around for testing – they may not vape as much as a 1 Ohm coil, but they will tell you if your mod fires. And, last but not least, get a 510-to-510 voltage measurement tool.

#6: Invest in knowledge.

Before carrying out voltage drop measurements, learn some basic facts about voltage drop and batteries. And check out Tip #5 again.

#7: Wrap coils that your batteries can handle and don’t go cheap on batteries.

Don’t go below 1 Ohm unless your battery is happy about it. Even good IMR batteries will at some point get stressed / damaged with use. Replace your batteries every 6 months and don’t trust labels blindly – a label is easy to fake. 16340, 14500 and 18350 batteries should not be used with sub-ohm resistances, with the exception of very good, high-discharge 18350 batteries, which are still borderline for sub-ohm vaping.

Don’t go cheap with batteries and chargers and always watch out for expensive fakes. Keep at least one protected battery aside for testing. Do not trust heavily short-circuited batteries even if they appear to work. Don’t power your mods with anything else than 3.7V batteries.

#8: Watch what you connect on top.

Atomizers with badly designed poles and off-shelf center post screws won’t cut it, even if they cost $200. The positive pole of your atomizer should be machined smoothly. Using off-shelf screws as electrical contacts is asking for trouble: Rough atomizer poles will quickly tear the plating on your mods’ pole screws and may cause overheating. Wire ends should be properly stabilized / fixed on properly designed contacts, especially when using resistance wire that heats up. Unstable wire ends will cause voltage drop and misfires.

#9: Take care of your equipment and it will take care of you.

It’s not bulletproof just because it’s mech. A Roller / Dingo can handle hard drops when assembled just fine, but you can’t expect a thin, threaded tube edge to survive a a hard drop unscarred. If you are clumsy, go for something heavier!

Always remember to lock your mod when carrying it in a pocket – the #1 cause for contact damage is overheating / arcing caused by accidental, repeated switch activations at a very low force (for example when forgetting the mod unlocked in a pocket, or when sitting on it by accident).

#10: Maintain the switch contacts of your mods.

All make-break (push-button) contacts on mech mods must be routinely cleaned to remove dust and moisture. If e-liquid gets into the switch assembly, disassemble the switch and clean the contacts right away!

Remember to re-fresh the silver-plating of your mod’s contacts once in a while! With use, the silver plating layer on them will start to wear off – don’t let that happen! Take the contacts of all your mods to your local jeweller’s and ask for a thick layer of pure silver at least every 5-6 months.

If left unmaintained for a long time, or if dust enters the switch assembly, the contacts of your mod will start to overheat and eventually get damaged / tarnished. For safety reasons, the switch of the Roller / Dingo is designed to fail at sustained temperatures above 150*C, to prevent the heat from reaching the battery.

Remember that all make-break switches must be operated above a minimum force to ensure a long life. The switch on the Roller / Dingo should be pressed with a force equivalent to 500-700 grams, which is still quite low. Use a kitchen scale to get an idea of how much that is.

2. Assembly / Disassembly Guide


To perform maintenance to your Roller/Dingo, follow our Roller/Dingo Assembly / Disassembly Guide.

3. Notes on Switch Use and Maintenance


Before using your Roller/Dingo for the first time, it might be a good idea to go through our Notes on Switch use and Maintenance, which apply to all mechanical devices.

4. Basic Facts about Voltage Drop and Batteries


To get the most out of any mechanical mod, some basic knowledge of electric circuits and batteries is absolutely necessary. Here’s some Basic Facts about Voltage Drop and Batteries that you should know when using a mechanical device.

5. Basic Facts about Sub-Ohm Vaping


Sub-ohm vaping is a gateway into the most technical aspects of vaping, which can be very enjoyable and rewarding only with the necessary technical knowledge, experience and dedication. Before experimenting with sub-ohm resistances, it is recommended to go through some Basic Facts about Sub-Ohm Vaping.

6. Troubleshooting


  1. The device is making a rattling sound.
  2. The switch is misfiring / The contacts inside the switch are tarnished.
  3. The button is getting stuck when pushed.
  4. The connector gets un-screwed along with the atomizer.
  5. Voltage drop issues.


Rattling Sound

The rattling sound that you hear when shaking the device is perfectly normal!

If you disassemble the device, you will notice that the moving contact rod that’s mounted on the axle of the switch is designed to “float” in its slot. The “seesaw” shape of this contact, along with its free-floating design help distribute the applied force evenly among the fixed hexagonal contacts, which gives the device its distinct, touch-sensitive firing ability.


Switch Misfires

The switch will start to misfire if liquid penetrates the switch assembly. This may happen if you remove the 510 connector or unscrew the main tube without first cleaning all leaked juice from the area around the pole adjustment screw.

If liquid penetrates the switch assembly, it will result in heavy arcing inside the switch, which will quickly cause the contacts to tarnish (turn black).

The contacts may also get tarnished if dirt, dust, or machining leftovers are preventing the switch contacts from touching each other firmly. A quick inspection of the switch around the contacts will quickly reveal the cause of misfires / tarnishing. In most cases, simply disassembling the switch and giving all components a thorough clean with alcohol should be enough.

If the contacts are tarnished, they should be cleaned with a cream suitable for silver-plated jewellery. Do not scrape or sand the contacts to clean them, as this will damage the silver-plating layer on them.

Keep in mind that misfires may not be directly related to the switch – for example, bad contact between the atomizer pole and the mod’s pole screw is a common cause for misfires. Intermittent heavy voltage drop issues may also be perceived as misfires, so it’s definitely a good idea to also check the Troubleshooting section dedicated to voltage drop issues, especially if the contacts of your mod appear to be shiny clean.


The button is getting stuck when pushed

If you have disassembled the Inner/Main Tube of your Roller/Dingo, you need to make sure that it has been re-assembled correctly. The button should always be centered in the hole of the switch housing – so that it can be pushed without grating against the washer around it. Note that operating the mod without taking care to follow these simple instructions may cause damage to the switch or the mod due to arcing.

The quickest way to resolve this is to unscrew the tube from the metal housing, and then screw it back in while holding down the button. Alternatively, press the button and give it a tug to the left so that it doesn’t jam against the washer around it. These adjustments should be made with your atomizer detached from the unit!

Make sure that the brass/alu reinforcement ring is always mounted on the back of the switch assembly. If you take out the reinforcement ring, the switch assembly will be pushed down when you mount an atomizer — as a result, the button will get stuck when pressed and the atomizer will not have proper contact with the mod, causing heavy arcing between the adjustable screw and atomizer pole.

It has come to our attention that some second-hand units have been sold with the reinforcement ring removed. Take note! Never operate the device without it!


The connector gets un-screwed along with the atomizer

Every component on Roller/Dingo is repairable / replaceable including the 510 connector. To prevent it from coming off along with your atomizers:

1) Don’t remove the large rubber liquid-sealing o-ring beneath the 510 connector.
2) Always tighten the 510 connector firmly on the switch housing with the help of a small coin.
3) Don’t over-tighten your atomizers on the connector. Overtightening your atomizers will prematurely destroy their threads and might slowly cause damage to the threads of the adjustable atomizer pole screw of your Roller.

Important: Some repairable atomizers, even from reputable manufacturers, come with oversized, non-standard 510 male connectors, sometimes almost 0.1mm larger than the size defined by the spec.


Voltage drop issues

Some voltage drop is normal, depending on the capabilities of the battery that you use. Excessive voltage drop can be traced to 4 possible causes:

1) The pole adjustment screw is not making good contact with the atomizer.
2) The hot-spring is heavily oxidized, collapsed, or not pressing against the battery firmly.
3) Your atomizer resistance is very low and/or you use a stressed or low-quality battery.
4) The switch is damaged or dirty.
5) The bottom cap disk is not tightened well, or not pressing against the battery firmly.

1) Always adjust the pole screw when exchanging atomizers! Unscrew it as much as needed to ensure good contact with your atomizer. If your atomizer has a shallow positive pole, install the supplied o-ring under the pole screw head of your Roller / Dingo. This will prevent the pole screw from getting screwed too deep when mounting your atomizer. Another quick way to get the same result is to wrap some no-res wire under the pole screw head.

2) The spring is made of brass and will start to deform when a short circuit happens and your battery starts to heat up, effectively opening the circuit. When the spring is oxidized or compressed / stressed, there will be a considerable contact resistance which will be translated into voltage loss and heat, even under normal operating conditions. Therefore, if you don’t have any other means of short-circuit protection and need to use the spring, it will need to be kept in place and shiny clean and frequently stretched to make firm contact with the battery.

When not using the spring, remember to remove the black delrin washer from the bottom cap, to allow contact between your battery and the metal disc. Voltage drops are also often traced to a very low spring force. When using a Roller with 18500/650 batteries, make sure that the telescopic tube is firmly tightened against the spring / battery. When using a Dingo, some performance can be gained by adjusting the bottom cap disc deeper, which increases battery / spring pressure. Alternatively, you can remove the spring completely and carefully adjust the bottom cap until it’s tight against the battery.

3) When vaping with a very low atomizer resistance (high current) and use a low quality or stressed battery (abnormally high internal battery resistance), there will be an excessive voltage drop in the battery itself, which you will not be able to measure in open circuit conditions. Keep in mind that a stressed battery under load will always consume some of its own power, which will translate into a reduced voltage on your load. Read more here.

4) Following the industry-standard at these power levels, the contacts are plated with a thick layer of silver, which possesses self-cleaning properties at mid/high currents. The result is that, even with heavy use, the contact areas will remain shiny clean, even when the areas around them start to oxidize. It is very unlikely that the switch will be the cause of voltage loss, unless i) the plating is scratched, or ii) the contacts don’t touch each other properly. When the contacts don’t press against each other well, the contacts may become resistive, which will result in misfires and / or voltage drop. This can only happen if there is dirt or tiny delrin particles inside the switch, or if you use a very low force when pressing the button (for example, if you accidentally sit on the mod for a while). If you open the switch and the contact surfaces are shiny clean (shinier than the area around them) it means that the switch is perfectly fine. If the contacts are tarnished (black), you will need to give the switch a good clean and if necessary have the contacts re-plated.

5) RO40+ and DI40+ units have an adjustable-height bottom cap disc. If the disc is not tightened well, it can cause an increased voltage drop on the mod. The disc can be tightened by inserting a hex key in the bottom cap vent. Alternatively, when adjusting the cap disc deeper, ensure that it is pressing firmly against the battery, by tightening the retractable tube (Roller) or adjusting the cap as far as needed (Dingo).


30 Topics discussed.

  1. Hi guys, I bought a used Dingo from a friend (which was working fine the day before I got it), I bought a Roller tube from you guys so I could use 18650 batteries but I can’t get the thing to fire… I’m using (very good quality) 2000 mAh batteries, is that likely to be an issue? They work fine on my VAMO 5 but nothing’s happening when I try them in the Dingo/Roller…

    Atomiser is a Kayfun Lite running at 1.8Ω…

    Another issue I had was not being able to get the plastic washer that lies under the switch to sit properly, it keeps popping back up… Any tips?

    Thanks in advance, J

    • Hey Joe,

      Make sure that the washer is not blocking the travel of the button – remove it completely if necessary.

      Also, since this is a used unit, it might be a good idea to disassemble and examine / maintain the internals of the switch:

      http://www.atmizoo.com/blog/notes-switch-use-maintenance/?lang=en

      Finally, make sure that you have form pole screw & spring contact and that the spring itself is not collapsed!

  2. Hello? I would like to know if its possible to use a 18650 battery with a kick, using 3 extension caps. Thanks in advance!

    • Hi Javier,

      Yes, it’s possible, but not really recommended due to the large number of connections between the tubes. Depending on the batteries that you use and the length of the Kick, 3 extensions might be a bit longer than ideal, but they will work.

    • We recommend the AW 18350 IMR.

      Flat top batteries work fine with the Roller / Dingo, too!

  3. Hello, i’m having issues getting a kick to work in my Roller. I have tried a genuine kick and a knock off kick, neither will work and I just can’t seem to figure out why not..

    using an 18350, I have no issues with my “69″ mod and a kick and, the kick fits snugger in my Roller than it does in the 69… I’ve cleaned all the threads thoroughly and, removed the bottom spring. it just won’t fire… I’ve read about others using a kick without the T2 kick ring? it’s not the end of the world but, I just wish I could figure out why it won’t fire with a kick. :)

    • Have you removed the delrin washer from the bottom cap?

      Your battery should also be able to pass through the bottom cap ring threads to make contact with the disc.

      It’s just a matter of mechanical contact, so if you take a good look at all the parts to see if proper contact is made when they are assembled together, you’ll definitely be able to track down the cause.

  4. Im finding that i have to set the button on my roller slightly off of the on position. On the on position in wont fire and ont he off position it wont fire so i have to set it inbetween. The button is correctly positioned on the device. any help? :)

    • I have opened up the switch and my contacts are nice and clean, i cant figure this out

    • Can you double check that:

      i) the ball bearing is correctly in place and the switch clicks as you twist the axle,
      ii) all contacts are clean, including the contact rod
      iii) the contact rod is clean and free to move / fall out of the axle slot (not fused in-place) and
      iv) the button is mounted correctly in relation to the ball-click positions?

      If all this is correct, then I can’t think of anything else that could cause this behaviour!

    • i’d like to thank you for all your help. the silver coating must have been damaged so i turned the contacts around for now until i can get them recoated

  5. Καλησπέρα. Είμαι κάτοχος του Dingo και είμαι ευχαριστημένος.
    Αποφάσισα να παραγγείλω το T2 ενώ περιμένω να παραλάβω το kick2.
    Διάβασα όμως πως

    “Το Kick παίρνει το + από την μπαταρία και το – από τα τοιχώματα του mod. Εάν το κουμπί επομένως και η διακοπή του κυκλώματος βρίσκεται στο κάτω μέρος, τότε και το Kick δεν κλείνει κύκλωμα. Εάν το κουμπί είναι πάνω από το το kick τότε βρίσκεται συνεχώς στο κύκλωμα.Δυστυχώς δεν διορθώνεται. Σε ΌΛΑ τα Mods που το κουμπί είναι πάνω από το Kick 2 κροταλίζει ψάχνοντας ατμοποιητή.
    Το Kick2 ή κατασκευάσθηκε για Mods μόνο με το κουμπί από κάτω, ή τους διέφυγε αυτή η λεπτομέρεια.”

    Στο Dingo, λογικά το kick μπαίνει κάτω από το κουμπί. Θα υπάρχει πρόβλημα αν ισχύουν τα παραπάνω;

    Ευχαριστώ

    • Καλησπέρα Βασίλη και Χρόνια Πολλά,

      Το θέμα με τον ήχο που αναφέρεις σε mods με κουμπί πάνω και το Kick 2 είναι γενικά γνωστό και μας έχει αναφερθεί πολλές φορές.

      Πράγματι το Kick 2 θα βρίσκεται διαρκώς υπό τάση σε mods που έχουν διακόπτη πάνω. Οι converters αυτού του τύπου συνήθως κατασκευάζονται με τέτοιο τρόπο ώστε ακόμη κι αν η είσοδος βρίσκεται υπό τάση, να καταναλώνουν από ελάχιστη έως καθόλου ισχύ όταν η έξοδος (ο ατμοποιητής) είναι ανοιχτοκυκλωμένη.

      Αυτό είναι λογικό και απαραίτητο σε κάθε σωστή υλοποίηση. Απ’ όσο γνωρίζουμε και σύμφωνα με την Evolv, το Kick 2 δεν “τραβάει” σημαντικό ρεύμα όταν η έξοδος είναι “ανοιχτή”, παράγει όμως το θόρυβο που αναφέρεις.

      Σημειωτέον ότι το Kick 1 δεν έπασχε από αυτό το πρόβλημα, οπότε πρόκειται για σημαντική παράλειψη από την πλευρά της Evolv.

      Σε mods με διακόπτη κάτω, η έξοδος του Kick είναι μόνιμα συνδεμένη στο φορτίο ενώ η είσοδος ελέγχεται από το διακόπτη, το ανάποδο δηλαδή.

      Τα mods με διακόπτη κάτω ανοίγουν / κλείνουν την επιστροφή του κυκλώματος *μετά* το φορτίο (-), ενώ τα mods με διακόπτη πάνω διακόπτουν *πριν* το φορτίο (+).

      Ηλεκτρικά, το καθιερωμένο είναι σαφώς το δεύτερο, κυρίως για λόγους ασφάλειας σε εγκαταστάσεις και κυκλώματα υψηλών τάσεων. Ένας προφανής λόγος είναι ο εξής: όταν εργαζόμαστε με ένα φορτίο που διακόπτεται στο (+), το φορτίο δεν πρέπει να βρίσκεται υπό τάση σε σχέση με τη γείωση της εγκατάστασης ή σε σχέση με εμάς.

      Σε DC εφαρμογές με μπαταρία αυτό αφορά κυκλώματα που το (-) μπαταρίας είναι γειωμένο, αλλά έχει καθιερωθεί ως σύμβαση κάθε κύκλωμα να διακόπτεται στο (+).

      Σχετικά με τον Τ2, αν μένεις στην Αθήνα θα σου συνιστούσαμε μια βόλτα από το εργαστήριό μας για ένα καλό “ματσάρισμα/βούρτσισμα” του Τ2 με το υπόλοιπο mod!

    • Ευχαριστώ για την απάντηση.
      Το T2 σας το έχω παραγγείλει ήδη.
      Θα περάσω μια βόλτα από το εργαστήριό σας σίγουρα αφού το παραλάβω.

  6. Hi, I just received my Roller, thanks. The center pin is too high, so when I screw on my Kayfun Lite style atomizer, un ugly gap remains between the Roller and the Kayfun. I removed the pin and there is no o-ring underneath it. Do I have to live with it as is?

    • Some Kayfuns / Kayfun clones have rather long positive poles, as far as 4.60-4.70mm from the base of the connection. This has been outlined by some reviewers, but this doesn’t mean that all atomizers are 100% identical. If yours is long, it will not sit 100% flush on the Roller without modifications.

  7. I’ve been using my Dingo for about 6 months now, and I love it. Very simple and elegant, and a breeze to polish. However, my button is getting annoying to the point of almost unusable. I am now continually getting the “button stuck in” issue where it is pressed against the thin plastic ring in the hole beneath it. I can take it back apart, get everything lined up correctly, but it’s not long before it’s gone back to the old state. Changing a battery or carrying it in the pocket both provide enough torque to shift it slightly, and it doesn’t take much. The little plastic ring does little if anything to prevent shifting of position, it simply gets pushed out.

    The solution to the problem would be a slot or flat spot on the button housing that lines up with a matching retainer on the mod body. I realize that’s not trivial, and doesn’t help the existing ones.

    A slightly easier solution would be to reshape the plastic internal piece of the button so that, instead of just a peg to receive the button, it would have a lip around that that protrudes through the mod body. Picture the plastic retaining ring being part of the button mechanism. this would be much more secure than the external ring because a) it can’t pop off and b) it’s anchored from the inside.

    At a bare minimum, I think a metal replacement for the external plastic ring would help a lot. It would be a bit more resistant to pressure.

    In the interest of full disclosure, I’m using it with an Ithaka, which has an adjustable center pole on the 510 connector. It’s a little finicky to get just the right height, so sometimes places too much pressure on the contact, ‘encouraging’ it to move downward. I always (now) make sure that the dingo is assembled tightly so that the retaining ring provides stabilizing pressure before attaching the atomizer. It is, IMO, a flaw in the design that the bottom of the battery is used to maintain the (vertical) position of the button, especially since removing that can cause the horizontal orientation to shift. I suppose I should use the very bottom cap for that, though.

    Again to reiterate, I love the device… If a new model with a better system of button stability comes out, I want 2 of ‘em!

    • Hi there!

      This behaviour depends on many factors, including:

      - The particular revision of the unit / switch: RO60 / 70+ units are easier to assemble, because the main tube doesn’t completely “lock” the switch.
      - The particular unit: On some older units the clearance between the button and the washer was too tight, which made the assembly quite fiddly. In these cases the best solution is to simply remove the button washer, whose purpose is *purely* cosmetic. The purpose of that washer is *not* to retain the position of the switch, as you describe. It’s there to simply look good (which is, actually, subjective) and possibly keep some dust out.
      - Component damage may cause the switch to get stuck. The switch components, may, for example, deform or break under *excessive* atomizer force.

      Another important thing to keep in mind is that you should not replace batteries by separating the main tube from the switch housing. Just use the cap. When you separate the tube from the switch housing, the switch assembly will get pushed down by the atomizer. Reinstalling the main tube with an atomizer mounted will not bring the button/assembly to its original position due to atomizer resistance. This is described here: http://www.atmizoo.com/blog/roller-dingo-10-tips/?lang=en

      The intention of the particular design (as dictated by common sense) is that batteries are inserted through the end cap, just like a flashlight. There is no practical reason to constantly separate the tube from the housing with an atomizer mounted. The purpose of the tube/housing connection is not to insert batteries: It’s only useful for disassembling the switch.

      Ideally, a perfect design should not give usability clues in the wrong places: If the connection between the tube and housing *can* be used to insert batteries, then some people *will* use it for that purpose, even if a better way exists.

      You will soon find that similar thoughts to the ones you have shared with us have already found their way into the Guppy, which is a uni-tube design that includes a switch retainment system: Although it is not a direct replacement of the Dingo, it is a good indication of things to come.

    • Thanks for the response. I need to break the habit and start using the end cap. Honestly, I had the device for a couple of weeks before I even noticed the end cap… it’s a really smooth seam. :)

      Good to know that the ring is only cosmetic. I think its the root of the problem, since as you say it’s quite close to the button. I’m not sure that it would even be noticeable if removed, so I’ll give that a try.

    • Just wanted to follow up. Several weeks of using it without the ring and changing batteries from the bottom, and it’s performing MUCH better now. Back into rotation as my go-to pocket-friendly mod!

    • Hi Aaron,

      We have a new batch of T2s coming soon, but double-lined extensions won’t be produced this time. Demand for those has been pretty limited, but we might consider making more in the near future.

  8. Hello. Been using my roller ice matte with a kick and now a kick 2. I vape only on boge lr cartomizers.. Setting the kick to around 8 watts. The problem is that the roller seems to cut of power, when this happens i can either loosen the telescopic tube or tighten it just a little and then it wil work for a while, then i have to loosen or thightening the tube to make it work again.
    This only happens in the roller as i have tried the same setup in other mods.
    I have also removed the spring and the derlin washer.
    I usualy clean the roller once a week.

    Otherwise im super happy with my roller.

    • Hi,

      Such issues are always traced to bad contact between the tube and the side contact of the Kick, due to the fact that the Roller has a ~19.1mm inner diameter (to reduce weight and be able to fit some 19mm protected batteries). Some Kick batches were known to have a smaller diameter, aggravating this issue.

      In most cases removing the spring and bottom cap washer solves such issues, but the condition of the Kick’s side contact is also a critical factor. If you are not using a T2 tube, then you can try stretching the side contact of your Kick a bit and perhaps carefully cleaning it if it appears to be oxidized.

      Otherwise, the only real solution is to use a T2 tube, which has an inner diameter more suitable for use with the Kick.

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